Rabbi David Walk, Education Director

Congregation Agudath Sholom | 301 Strawberry Hill Ave | Stamford, CT 06902 (203)-358-2200 www.agudathsholom.org

Thursday, September 27, 2018

National Retail Hobby Stores Association 2018 Attendees List

Hi,          

 

This is an outstanding offer for the National Retail Hobby Stores Association 2018 Exhibitors.

 

I am writing to check if you would be interested in acquiring the list of 5,896  attendees for your marketing and sales initiatives.

 

This is an opportunity to acquire list of attendees contact details for a robust marketing campaign which will eventually help you convert the compiled leads in to phenomenal sales deal.

 

You will receive the file for permanent usage where you can use this list for multiple campaigns and cold calling. Please find below mentioned data fields for your review.

 

Company Name, Company URL, Contact Name, Title, Phone number, Fax Number, Email Address, Company Address, Industry type, SIC Code.

 

Please revert with your interest to get you connected with our Business Development Manager, who will send out the counts, pricing and samples for your review.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

Camila Zoe
Marketing and Communications

Global EXPO LIST

 


Wednesday, September 26, 2018

JBIZ Expo 2018 Attendees List

Hi,       

 

This is an outstanding offer for the JBIZ Expo 2018 Exhibitors.

 

I am writing to check if you would be interested in acquiring the list of 5,836 attendees for your marketing and sales initiatives.

 

This is an opportunity to acquire list of attendees contact details for a robust marketing campaign which will eventually help you convert the compiled leads in to phenomenal sales deal.

 

You will receive the file for permanent usage where you can use this list for multiple campaigns and cold calling. Please find below mentioned data fields for your review.

 

Company Name, Company URL, Contact Name, Title, Phone number, Fax Number, Email Address, Company Address, Industry type, SIC Code.

 

Please revert with your interest to get you connected with our Business Development Manager, who will send out the counts, pricing and samples for your review.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

Miya jewel
Marketing and Communications

Global EXPO LIST


Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Walk Article

WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 

Shabbat Chol Hamoed Sukkot-5779 

Rabbi David Walk 

 

Growing up, I remember looking at the graduation picture of my father OB"M from Chelsea (MA) High, Class of '27. The caption read, 'Under this tough exterior beats a heart of gold.' It's the only picture I ever saw of my father with hair.  I've often thought, 'How did they know he had a heart of gold?' Was it a surmise? The 'tough exterior' was a given. Anyway, flash forward a half century and young people picked their own quotes. Usually these reflected one of two sentiments. Either the continuation of friendship (usually not true, but reflecting happy high school experiences), or optimism about the future (probably a fifty-fifty proposition, but based on negative high school vibes). I bring this up because I want to share the yearbook quote of a hero of mine, Dr. Jonathan Haidt, 'Whoever shall not fall by the sword or by famine, shall fall by pestilence, so why bother shaving?' Kohelet couldn't have said it better. 

First of all, who is Dr. Haidt? Based upon the quote he chose, one could guess, correctly, that he was a philosophy major in college, but he moved on to social psychology and has found some meaning in life. He's written a couple of books (The Happiness Hypothesis, 2006, and Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, 2012) which have helped me think about life, relationships and happiness. However, back in 1981, when he chose that quote, he was in despair. He had a model life back in Scarsdale, NY, but still felt that Kohelet was right, 'all is vanity and a chasing after wind (Kohelet 1:14). 

That brings us to our other author, Kohelet. Of course, traditionally we assume that it was Shlomo Hemelech, but he could have been any descendant of King David. Talk about depressed, he was worse than Marvin the depressed computer from The Hitchhiker's Guide ('My capacity for happiness could fit into a matchbox, without taking the matches out first,' or 'I could calculate your chance of survival, but you won't like it'). The entire book is based on the premise that everything is futile. It's a good thing that most of the people in shuls aren't really paying attention while it's read on Shabbat Chol Hamoed of Sukkot. 

Here's the famous beginning of the book: Utter vanity! Said Kohelet. Vanity of vanities! All is vanity! What real value is there for man, in all his efforts under the sun? One generation goes, another comes, but the earth stays the same forever...All streams flow into the sea, yet the sea is never full...I have observed all the happenings under the sun and they are all vanity and a vexation of spirit (Kohelet 1:2-4, 7, 14). 

We have other depressing books in the Bible, but we usually have the good sense to rarely open them. This one the Sages demand that we read publicly once a year! But what's the point? Why read this depressing material on the otherwise happiest festival of the year? Some rabbis have said that its purpose is to tone down frivolity, as opposed to genuine joy for the spiritual attainments of the season. Okay, but I'd like to propose another answer. Its role is to make us think about life's real possibilities. 

To begin, there are two expressions which Kohelet uses a lot. They are HEVEL and RE'UT RUACH. So far. I've only given you the very famous King James translations of those terms. It's time that we looked at them more closely. HEVEL describes the steam-like breath we emit on a cold winter's day. So, others have abandoned 'vanity' for 'futility'. Our acts have no meaning or purpose, because they are so short lived. Others have suggested 'fleeting' or 'foolish'. Dr. Robert Alter goes for 'merest breath'. I might have suggested 'hot air'. So, the first term which denigrates human effort implies that our efforts are meaningless because they have no lasting impact over time. 

The other term, RE'UT RUACH, was translated 'as vexation of the spirit'. I'm not sure that I know what that means. It seems to imply that we get no satisfaction from the endeavor. However, many more recent attempts to translate this phrase have decided that the Hebrew word RUACH, should be translated in its literal sense of 'wind'. The Mossad Rav Kook commentary stresses that it's related to the phrase RO'EH RUACH from the book of Hoshea (12:2). There it means to 'herd the wind'. What a beautiful description of worthless effort! It reminds me of when I had to round up fifth graders after recess. 

Here are the two complaints: 1. nothing we do lasts, and 2. our efforts seem worthless. What' a human to do? Sadly, give up is an option, but I think that I have a better suggestion. My first thought is from William Wordsworth, 'The world is too much with me; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers.' We waste precious energy on acquiring things. The problem is that we think, and have thought for a long time, that happiness and meaning comes from 'things'. That's never been true and Kohelet was wealthy enough to understand that. We mistakenly believe that meaning can be found or uncovered. Not true! Meaning must be made, by us. 

How do we do that? Haidt calls the quest for the meaning of life 'The Holy Question'. Ultimately, Kohelet gives the religious answer: Revere God, observe commandments (12:13). Fine, but let's listen to the psychologist who has a commentary on that idea. We manufacture meaning and produce purpose by loving and working, 'Just as plants need sun, water and soil to thrive, people need love, work and a connection to something greater than themselves.' Everyone requires relationships between yourself and others, yourself and your work, yourself and your God. Then your actions don't seem ephemeral or futile. They become lasting and meaningful. 

Perhaps Shakespeare said it best, 'Joy's soul lies in the doing.' 


Archive